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Indigenous people, multiple disadvantage, and response to legal problems

This report is one in a series of Australian reports published on the various types of barriers faced by Indigenous people facing legal problems. The researchers analyzed a subset of data drawn from an earlier nation-wide survey of legal needs to determine response to legal problems based on Indigenous status and level of disadvantage. The researchers concluded that “the strategy Indigenous people use in response to their legal problems depends on their level of disadvantage. Those with multiple disadvantage are significantly more likely to take no action.”

Amongst those Indigenous people who do take action, they are significantly more likely to go to a non-profit legal services rather than use self-help materials. Indigenous status and level of disadvantage also created a difference in the types of advisors consulted and the barriers in facing legal problems. The report concluded that these findings highlight the need for legal services “that are not only appropriate to the legal needs and capability of multiply disadvantaged Indigenous people, but also accessible and clientfocused.”

See also a 2014 report on Indigenous people’s experience of multiple legal problems, and a 2018 report on specific barriers faced by Indigenous people in solving legal problems.

Author: Coumarelos, Christine; McDonald, Hugh McIntosh
Title of Work: Indigenous people, multiple disadvantage, and response to legal problems
Date: 2015
Organization: Law and Justice Foundation of New South Wales
URL: Click here http://www.lawfoundation.net.au/ljf/site/templates/UpdatingJustice/$file/UJ_48_Indigenous_people_multi_disadvantage.pdf
Topic: Aboriginal communities & PLE audiences
Location of Authoring Organization by Country: Australia
Location of Authoring Organization by Province/ State (unless national entity): New South Wales
Availability: Full report online
Language: English