Case Studies

  • Adventures in PLE, part 2

    Perhaps the most important part of preparing to set up and deliver public legal education and information sessions is knowing your audience – what kinds of things they want to hear about, and why.

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  • Adventures in PLE, part 1

    We’ve written here before about the use of games in public legal education and information (PLE) work. Guest author Barbara Hurd, a long-time community legal worker, joins us today to talk about some of her experiences using games in her PLE work. A while back, a group of community legal workers and community legal clinic […]

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  • Justice at your library?

    “We learned that librarians wanted to learn more about what role public library staff could play to connect people dealing with common legal problems to the justice resources that they needed. They were also interested in building their skills at “red-flagging” legal issues and displaying plain language legal information.”

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  • Let’s discuss creative strategies

    We’ve learned recently about some public legal education and information projects that bring a creative approach to sharing information – literally. They use arts, crafts, games and theatre to help people share stories and information.

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  • Getting graphic with public legal education

    We’d like to share the story of how the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted (AIDWYC) created a graphic novel for youth called “The Jakob Jackson Story: How Jakob Jackson was almost sent to prison for a crime he didn’t commit”.

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  • Storytelling, chocolate and research

    Monica’s team includes a poet and playwright who both love to use storytelling in their work as they develop content and engage with communities. They view stories as a great way to mobilize and enthuse trusted intermediaries and educate them about the legal resources available to their clients.

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  • The wizards of Oz: learnings from Australia

    We welcome Michele Leering of the Community Advocacy & Legal Centre in Belleville, Ontario as a regular guest author for the PLexchange. Michele has recently returned from a self-funded study leave in which she explored approaches to public legal education and information (PLE) and access to justice issues in several different countries, including Australia. She will be joining us once a month to chat about what she learned on her trip.

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  • The need for assessment

    Are you designing a training program for community intermediaries to help reach your target audience? No matter how well you know your target audience, it’s important to take the time to conduct a needs assessment before you start to design program content.

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  • Game changers

    Looking for less traditional public legal education and information tools? When METRAC, a Toronto-based charity serving women and youth, wanted to produce an educational tool for young people to challenge sexual violence, they worked with youth to develop a digital quiz game.

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  • Working close to the ground

    When designing PLE, working with agencies from other sectors can help make your materials more relevant to your audience. The Federation of Metro Tenants’ Associations was reminded of the importance of staying close to the ground when working on the Connecting Communities Tenants’ School project in collaboration with settlement agencies.

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